What is the strongest alcoholic drink that existed during the Middle Ages in Europe?

Beer during the Middle Ages was naturally produced in a wide range of alcohol concentrations, generally classed as strong beers of 8-14% ABV; medium beers of about 4-8% ABV, and weak beers of 1-3% ABV.

What alcohol did they drink in medieval times?

The nobles would drink wine and beer, wine being favourable, but the latter would only tend to be served during important celebratory occasions. More commonly, the majority of Europeans making up lower social class standings would consume drinks such as ale, fruit juice, cider and mead.

How strong was alcohol in the Middle Ages?

These spirits would have had a much lower alcohol content (about 40% ABV) than the alchemists’ pure distillations, and they were likely first thought of as medicinal elixirs.

Was there hard liquor in Middle Ages?

The first recorded account for whiskey was in 1495. Certainly, it had been around before then. It seems logical to presume that brandy was the most common hard liquor in the Late Middle Ages. It was in any case more widespread throughout Europe during this time frame.

What did they drink in Middle Ages?

Food & Drink in the Medieval Village

All classes commonly drank ale or beer. Milk was also available, but usually reserved for younger people. Wine was imported from France and Italy for those with money. The wealthier you were, the better you ate.

What alcohol did Knights drink?

The nobles drank wine and beer, with the former being preferred, and the latter being reserved for special occasions. Drinks like ale, fruit juice, cider, and mead were more commonly consumed by the majority of Europeans from lower social classes.

How strong was beer in the Middle Ages?

Beer during the Middle Ages was naturally produced in a wide range of alcohol concentrations, generally classed as strong beers of 8-14% ABV; medium beers of about 4-8% ABV, and weak beers of 1-3% ABV.

How strong was wine in Roman times?

They were restricted to using wild strains, blowing around the vineyard and found on the skins of grapes. Wild yeasts often struggle to continue converting sugars to alcohol at about 6% and, all things going well, secondary yeasts then kick in to push abv higher.

How drunk were people in the Middle Ages?

According to HowStuffWorks, the beer of Medieval Europe was weaker than that of today, with the ABV speculated to have been around three percent.