Alternative corks vs natural corks. What is the difference?

Synthetic corks are not actually made from cork. Instead, these cork-lookalikes are made from plastic compounds designed to act like natural cork. The benefit of these corks is having little-to-no risk of TCA contamination, or cork taint.

How can you tell the difference between synthetic and natural corks?

You can’t tell just by looking at a bottle of wine if the cork inside is natural or synthetic, but once you remove the capsule and pull the cork, it should be pretty easy. Most synthetic corks look and feel like polyethylene—they are smooth, almost like plastic, and sometimes come in non-cork colors.

What are natural corks?

Natural cork is derived from the bark of cork trees, which is actually a very environmentally friendly process. The bark is a renewable resource that grows back over time. Cork bark is striped every ten years, and each individual tree can produce bark for up to 200 years.

Are all corks the same?

They are sizes: #7, #8, #9 and #10. These numbers refer to the diameter of the cork. The higher the number, the larger the diameter of the cork. The opening of a standard, 750 ml wine bottle is 3/4 of an inch.

Which wine corks are best?

Colmated Cork (natural cork): The colmated cork is 90% natural cork and 10 % natural glue mixed with cork granules. These are the best wine corks for bottling if you are looking for strong, high quality corks that provide a good seal and will not fall apart when stored for long periods.

What are the different types of corks?

What are the Different Types of Wine Corks and Other Closures?

  • Natural Cork. Natural cork is a renewable, recyclable, and biodegradable wine closure option. …
  • Synthetic Cork. …
  • Champagne/Sparkling Wine Cork. …
  • Grainy (Agglomerate) Cork. …
  • Capped Cork. …
  • Screw Cap. …
  • Hermetic Cork. …
  • Vino-Lok/Vinoseal: